Difference between revisions of "Anatoly Brandukov"

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Russian cellist and composer (b, 25 December 1858/6 January 1859 in [[Moscow]]; d. 13 February 1930 in [[Moscow]]), born '''''Anatoly Andreyevich Brandukov''''' (Анатолий Андреевич Брандуков).
 
Russian cellist and composer (b, 25 December 1858/6 January 1859 in [[Moscow]]; d. 13 February 1930 in [[Moscow]]), born '''''Anatoly Andreyevich Brandukov''''' (Анатолий Андреевич Брандуков).
  

Latest revision as of 18:12, 25 October 2020

Anatoly Brandukov (1859–1930)
Photographed with Tchaikovsky in 1888

Russian cellist and composer (b, 25 December 1858/6 January 1859 in Moscow; d. 13 February 1930 in Moscow), born Anatoly Andreyevich Brandukov (Анатолий Андреевич Брандуков).

Brandukov studied at the Moscow Conservatory in the cello class of Wilhelm Fitzenhagen, and in Tchaikovsky's harmony and instrumentation classes. After graduating in 1877 he lived largely in Switzerland and France, while continuing to give concerts in Russia.

A close friend of Tchaikovsky, the composer greatly admired Brandukov's abilities as a performer, and wanted him to succeed Fitzenhagen as professor of cello studies at the Moscow Conservatory when the latter died in 1890. Brandukov was a great exponent of Tchaikovsky's cello works, and was the first to play his Pezzo capriccioso, Op. 62 (1887), which was dedicated to him. In the late 1880s the composer also made special arrangements of the Andante cantabile from his String Quartet No. 1, and the Nocturne — No. 4 of the Six Pieces, Op. 19 — for Brandukov to performed as soloist in their joint concerts.

In 1906 Brandukov was appointed professor and director of the Moscow Philharmonic School of Music and Drama, and he became a professor at the Moscow Conservatory in 1921. Brandukov also composed a number of his own cello pieces, the manuscripts of which are preserved in the Tchaikovsky House-Museum at Klin.

Tchaikovsky's Works Dedicated to Anatoly Brandukov

Correspondence with Tchaikovsky

17 letters from Tchaikovsky to Anatoly Brandukov have survived, dating from 1886 to 1893, all of which have been translated into English on this website:

6 letters from Brandukov to the composer, dating from 1885 to 1893, are preserved in the Klin House-Museum Archive,

External Links