Letter 3546

Tchaikovsky Research
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Date 13/25 April 1888
Addressed to Anatoly Brandukov
Where written Tiflis
Language Russian
Autograph Location Klin (Russia): Tchaikovsky State Memorial Musical Museum-Reserve (a3, No. 24)
Publication П. И. Чайковский. Полное собрание сочинений, том XIV (1974), p. 407

Text and Translation

Russian text
(original)
English translation
By Brett Langston
13/25 Avril [18]88

Как тебе не стыдно, Толя! Хоть бы одно словечко написал! Хорош друг! Ведь мне не нужно больших, подробных писем, — ну хоть такое, как моё это, написал бы. А мне так интересно знать, что ты поделываешь, как твои дела, как здоровье, как и чем кончил Кротков, вообще в десяти строчках ты бы мог сообщить мне множество интересного.

Я провёл три очень приятных недели в Тифлисе; послезавтра еду в Москву и, вероятно, Петербург, а потом в деревню. Адрес мой тот же, т. е. Моск[овская] губ[ернии] гор[од] Клин, только вместо с[еле] Майданово селе Фроловское. Обнимаю тебя, бессовестный виолончелистишка!

П. Чайковский

13/25 April 1888

Aren't you ashamed, Tolya! If only you'd written one little word! A fine friend you are! You know I don't need long, detailed letters—well, at least the sort that I'd write like this. And I'm so interested to know what you've been up to, what your plans are, how your health is, whether you've finished with Krotkov [1], or generally in ten short lines you could tell me many interesting things.

I've spent three very pleasant weeks in Tiflis; the day after tomorrow I'm off to Moscow, and probably Petersburg, and then to the country. Address me there as usual, i.e. Moscow province, town of Klin, only Frolovskoye village instead of Maydanovo. I hug you, you inconsiderate young cellist!

P. Tchaikovsky

Notes and References

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  1. 1.0 1.1 Nikolay Sergeyevich Krotkov (1849-?), Russian composer and conductor at the Aleksandrinsky and Mikhaylovsky Theatres in Saint Petersburg, who at that time was attempting to organise a Russian concert in Paris on behalf of the Smolensk branch of the Russian Musical Society, and had sought Tchaikovsky's assistance while he was visiting the French capital in February and March.